An important story

A quick post today, to give you the heads up on a brand new, very special item in The TBYL Store.

I’m thrilled to be able to stock this very important picture book, My Mum has Breast Cancer, by Lisa Sewards and Harrison Sewards. This book was a great help to me when we were managing our way through breast cancer, and I would recommend it to anyone who’s faced with the difficult situation of talking to kids about this far too common illness.

My Mum has Breast Cancer is the personal story of one Mother’s journey with breast cancer told through the eyes of her 6 year old son.

It aims to provide families with a storybook that gently and compassionately explains the breast cancer journey in an informative and engaging way.  This personal account attempts to accept and normalise the trauma of experiencing cancer, and helps shift the focus, rather like looking into the light instead of the darkness.

The book is written so that children can relate to it, and includes explanations of medical treatments to facilitate discussion between parents, carers and young children.  It assists in opening the lines of communication between you and your child.

The fantastic illustrations tell most of the story on their own.  They also illustrate the heroes we meet in the medical world. It’s suitable for children aged 3-10 years

50% of the sale price of every copy of My Mum has Breast Cancer sold will be donated directly to Breast Cancer Network Australia.

Buy your a copy of My Mum has Breast Cancer, at the TBYL Store!


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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. subtlekate
    Apr 10, 2012 @ 03:37:07

    How fantastic. Particularly good for little kids. I used something similar but a little more grown up for mine because he’s a little older, but it was so very helpful.

    Reply

    • That Book You Like
      Apr 10, 2012 @ 03:43:23

      It’s amazing how much easier a good book can make these difficult conversations. Ev was a little old for it too, but I think he still took a lot from it, and it helped him just knowing that he wasn’t the first (then) 9 year old to have to deal with this kind of thing.

      Reply

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